Posts Tagged ‘stainless steel sheet metal’

Cold-Rolled vs. Hot Rolled Stainless Steel

 :: Posted by MelW on 05-29-2014

Cold-rolling and hot-rolling are the two main methods by which stainless steel fabricators craft stainless steel sheets, counters, BBQs, and other items. There are benefits and downsides to both methods.

When stainless steel is cold-rolled, it is rolled to the final dimensions and specifications when the metal is far below scalding temperatures. The main benefit to this method is that the steel will not shrink once it is cooled, unlike hot rolled steel, which can shrink after the metal cools below 1700 degrees Fahrenheit.

With hot rolled steel, the steel is formed to its final dimensions and specifications, while the temperature is above scalding temperatures. An advantage here is that the metal is stress-free once it has been rolled and forged. Cold rolled steel can often twist or warp if it undergoes further machining, making it a poor option for many industrial tasks. It is for this reason that many stainless steel fabricators offer stainless steel sheet metal that has been fabricated using both methods.

Here are a few more key differences between metals forged by these two different processes:

  • Hot rolled steel tends to be slightly looser and have less tolerance than cold rolled steel.
  • Cold rolled steel tends to contain less carbon and slag, while hot rolled steel contains between .18 and .30 percent carbon content. This makes hot rolled steel more difficult to forge in more traditional manners.
  • Cold rolled steel has a more natural inclination to twist, making it ideal for decorative applications.

Looking Beyond the Initial Cost of Stainless Steel Sheet Metal

 :: Posted by MelW on 05-27-2014

In spite of the many positive qualities of stainless steel sheet metal, many homeowners find it difficult to look past the high initial price. While by no means the most expensive material available for kitchen appliances, backsplashes or counters, stainless steel does have a steep price that makes people think twice. The reality is, however, that stainless steel more than makes up for its higher initial price when you look at the cost savings over the long term.

Say, for example, you purchase a stainless steel refrigerator intending to keep it for as long as it stays functional. After it is paid for and placed in your kitchen, you use it day in and day out. Over time and frequent usage, a host of issues could theoretically present themselves, like stains, dirt, grime, corrosion and damage. The stainless steel material this refrigerator is made of is likely to have minimal costs for repair, cleaning or other maintenance.

This is precisely why you need to look beyond the initial cost of a stainless steel kitchen. Instead, look toward future savings. Stainless steel is famous for its resistance to rust and staining. Consider the costs of sealing granite counters or refinishing wood surfaces in your kitchen. You will see how much you save with a low maintenance material like stainless steel. Combine these benefits with the durability and long lifespan of stainless steel, and you have a winning recipe for cost savings and a great kitchen.

What Is Stainless Steel?

 :: Posted by MelW on 05-13-2014

You’ve definitely heard about stainless steel, and you likely know that it is one of the best types of steel available, whether you are considering stainless steel kitchen appliances or stainless steel sheets, but what exactly is this coating? What makes it so special?

Stainless steel, also known as inox steel, is a steel alloy that has a minimum of 10.5% chromium content by mass. This content prevents the steel from corroding, rusting, or decaying in any other ways for many years. This steel is similar to carbon steel, but has a much higher chromium content, which prevents the rusting that is common when carbon steel is exposed to air.

Stainless steel has been in use for many years, with artifacts being found in India as early as 400 AD. These primitive stainless objects got their corrosion resistance from phosphorus content instead of chromium.

The first true iron-chromium alloys were found in France in 1821, and were created by the metallurgist Pierre Berthier. After some experimenting, Berthier noted high resistance to attacks by acids and air. A German metallurgist created a quicker process for creating stainless steel in the 1890s, and it was used more widely, starting in the first few decades of the 1900s.

Since then, stainless steel has been prevalent in many different industries and has been integral in strengthening products, including kitchen appliances, utensils, cabinets, backsplashes, BBQs, and much more.

For a coated iron alloy that won’t corrode, rust, or decay, stainless steel is the only option.

Benefits of Stainless Steel: Part II

 :: Posted by MelW on 04-22-2014

In our previous blog post, we provided some of the benefits that stainless steel offers, including its resistance to fire, heat, and corrosion. We also provided information on which grades are commonly used for indoor applications, and which are commonly used for outdoor applications. We only just touched on the many applications and benefits of this versatile metal, however, so here are more of the benefits and uses of stainless steel:

  • Stainless steel has a much lower environmental impact than other types of metal. In fact, 95% of the world’s stainless steel comes from recycled products, making this one of the most environmentally friendly materials to use for any application.
  • It is also an incredibly hygienic surface, since it is so easy to keep clean. In fact, it can be brushed with a cotton ball without collecting any residue, making it literally clean enough to eat off of. It is preferred in the food and beverage industry for just this reason, and is perfect for kitchen applications.
  • This material is also incredibly strong, particularly for the width. You can create walls that are much thinner with equal strength to other materials, meaning less waste and more product flows.
  • It is workable and easy to use in any application. Stainless steel sheets can be easily fabricated, cut, rolled, formed, calibrated, welded and machined, particularly in comparison with most traditional types of steel.
  • Stainless steel is one of the fastest growing materials in the world, making it one of the most available metals in the world. No matter for what you are purchasing stainless, whether you want a stainless steel grill or stainless steel sheet metal, you can purchase and receive it in next to no time.

Should You Go With Stainless Steel Sheet Metal for Your Countertops?

 :: Posted by MelW on 03-25-2014

In answering the question of whether you should go with stainless steel sheet metal as the material for your countertops, consider what you see in commercial restaurant kitchens. Invariably, your favorite restaurant has counters made of stainless steel sheet. This fact is an indication that stainless steel might be a good choice for your kitchen. There are a few reasons why commercial kitchens are usually outfitted with stainless steel.

In essence, serious cooks rely on stainless sheet metal because of a few key properties:

  • Resistant to heat
  • Resistant to corrosion
  • Non-staining
  • Hygienic and easy to clean

These properties make it a good material for kitchen countertops where you’re going to be preparing a lot of food. You should ask yourself how serious you are about cooking. If you’re not going to be using the kitchen counters for much more than placing dishes on it, you might find stainless steel sheet to be overkill for your needs. Even if you’re not a chef, though, you can benefit from these properties, as well as stainless steel’s properties of low maintenance requirements and high durability.

Finally, you should consider aesthetics. Are you going with stainless steel kitchen appliances too? Having too much stainless steel could lead to an industrial look that some people don’t find very homey. However, there’s a middle ground where stainless steel is paired with wood, marble, and other materials, creating an attractive finished product. If you like the look of stainless steel and intend to use your kitchen for food preparation and cooking, there’s plenty of reason to adopt stainless steel sheet metal for your countertops.

Looking Beyond the Initial Cost of Stainless Steel Sheet Metal

 :: Posted by MelW on 03-04-2014

In spite of the many positive qualities of stainless steel sheet metal, many homeowners find it difficult to look past the fairly high initial price. While by no means the most expensive material available for kitchen appliances, backsplashes or counters, stainless steel does have a steep enough price to make people think twice. However, the reality is that stainless steel more than makes up for its higher initial price when you look at the cost savings of owning it over the long term.

For example, say you purchase a stainless steel refrigerator that you intend to keep for as long as it stays functional. After you’ve paid for it and placed it in your kitchen, you use it day in and day out. Over time and frequent usage, a host of issues could theoretically present themselves, like stains, dirt, grime, corrosion and damage. However, because the material of this refrigerator is stainless steel sheet, you’re likely to have minimal costs for repair, cleaning or other maintenance.

That’s precisely why you need to look beyond the initial cost of a stainless steel kitchen to what it costs in the future. Stainless steel is famous for its resistance to rust and staining. Consider the costs of sealing granite counters or refinishing wood surfaces, and you’ll see how much you save with a low maintenance material like stainless steel. Combine these benefits with the durability and long lifespan of stainless steel, and you have a winning recipe for cost savings and a great kitchen.

The Value of Stainless Steel Sheet Metal in Buildings

 :: Posted by MelW on 02-11-2014

Popular consumer products like stainless steel BBQ grills and kitchen backsplashes benefit from stainless steel, but stainless steel has broader applications beyond these products. The main thing that distinguishes stainless steel sheet metal from other metals is the presence of an element known as chromium. This element helps naturally form a thin layer on the surface of the stainless steel sheet, protecting it from corrosion and damage. However, the benefits go even a step beyond this, as the layer works well to insulate heat.

The ability to repel solar energy is a factor of stainless steel that doesn’t get talked about as much as it should. Stainless steel works very well as a surface for roofs, being a fairly lightweight material that isn’t bulky and which achieves excellent insulation for the building. You save on installation costs upfront, as well as energy costs in the long run. When you add in the lower cost of maintenance, due to the fact that stainless steel isn’t prone to degrading or corrosion like other metals and materials, you find a fantastic choice for building exteriors.

Have you ever wondered how it’s possible for some stainless steel in older buildings to still be so pristine? It’s because of the presence of this chromium layer that acts as a shield to protect the integrity of the metal. It’s definitely worth looking into stainless steel sheets for any building or project that could benefit from these unique properties of stainless steel.

Is Stainless Steel the Right Material for Your Cookware?

 :: Posted by MelW on 11-21-2013

While you’re most likely used to seeing stainless steel kitchen appliances in your home, the homes of others, and commercial kitchens, you might not automatically leap to the conclusion that stainless steel sheet is a good choice as a material in your cookware. To answer the question of whether it’s right for your cookware, it helps to take a look back at the kind of materials that comprise most cookware traditionally. The main requirement is that utensils heat evenly and don’t interfere in the taste of the foods being prepared, such as by injecting a metallic taste.

Some of the best cookware combines two metals, rather than just one. That’s why you’ll often find a pan made from stainless steel sheet metal, with a copper base to help conduct the heat. In reality, stainless steel on its own isn’t always the ideal choice for cookware, but when it’s paired with other materials in today’s modern cookware products, it’s a great choice. At the same time, there are 304 stainless steel BBQ grills that are all-stainless steel and serve as some of the best products available for heating up food. As is the case with most products, it’s up to you to do your own experimentation and decide what’s right for you, but on the whole, stainless steel remains a solid choice for your cookware.

The 100th Anniversary of Stainless Steel

 :: Posted by MelW on 05-14-2013

It’s the 100th anniversary of stainless steel!  And as a visual tribute – a mural of the man who discovered one of the world’s most popular types of steel,

Harry Brealey, has been created.  Resident and original entrepreneur of  Sheffield England, Brealey came up the concept of stainless steel in his Brown Firth Laboratory a century ago. From his discovery others forms of steel were created like steel like stainless steel sheet metal, galvanized steel, and mild steel.

Today, the Howard Hotel in Sheffield showcases a 42 foot black and white portrait of the stainless steel hero that not only stands as a tribute, but also symbolizes innovation for the area. “The discovery of stainless steel is one of Sheffield’s greatest stories and we wanted to celebrate the discovery’s centenary by making the next generation of inventors and innovators aware of what can be achieved in this great city of ours,” said Director Brendan Moffett.

Blending old-fashioned craftsmanship with cutting-edge technology, Starland metals is your place for stainless steel metals, coils, plate, and rods.

Stainless Steel And The Value Of Nickel

 :: Posted by MelW on 05-09-2013

There is currently a worldwide deficit of nickel. Stainless steel fabrication drives the prices of worldwide nickel just as much as the success of nickel depends on the pricing of stainless steel. The reason nickel and stainless steel have such a close relationship is that two-thirds of all nickel that the world mines and produces is incorporated into steel. By itself, nickel holds very little value.

It wasn’t until 1820 when Michael Faraday found that adding nickel to iron made a stronger metal. It was so strong in fact that the US military began producing nickel steel in 1885. They made weapons from nickel steel which became a critical commodity during times of war. Nickel is also combined with other metals like cobalt in order to produce super alloys used in military machinery like missiles and jet aircraft.  During the Korean conflict the U.S. the price of nickel shot up because of increased demand.  At that point the government took over production of nickel but then gave up control during the ceasefire in 1957.  Prices continued to rise and fall depending upon the demand. And while stainless steel sheet metal is composed mostly of chromium, nickel is less abundant, making up 60% of the cost of steel.

Shop Starland Metal for high-quality, stainless steel backsplash sheets, stainless steel backsplash tiles and other hard-to-find metal products.